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Edmunds Drives 2019 Chevy Volt 70 Miles On Single Charge

first_img11 photos Source: Electric Vehicle News Chevy Volt Electric And Fuel Economy Tests Exceed EPA Numbers To Date, Chevy Volt Drivers Have Saved 108 Million Gallons Of Gas Is The Chevy Volt Your Best Bet For A Used $15,000 Car? That’s a more than 32 percent improvement over the 53 miles of all-electric range (AER) the EPA rates it at, which is pretty good in our books. So impressed by it was Edmunds that they shared the achievement with us on Twitter, and even included a photograph of the center console display as proof (embedded below).@InsideEVs have you seen any similar reports? https://t.co/KTVOU6kKvz— Edmunds (@edmunds) November 8, 2018center_img Source: Twitter Not bad. For beginners.Sometimes it seems like the Chevy Volt doesn’t get the love it should. Now three years into its 2nd generation, it’s crowded out of headlines by other plug-in cars like the Tesla Model 3. Even its own stablemate, the all-electric Chevy Bolt gets more attention nowadays. That doesn’t mean the plug-in hybrid can’t still impress, though. Case in point? Edmunds is silly delighted that they recently managed to travel 70 miles on a single charge.More on the Chevy Volt Well, to answer the question posed by our publishing pals, yes, we have seen similar mileage returns from the Chevy Volt. In fact, while 70 miles is a pretty impressive result for almost any driver, one who specializes in hypermiling can do better. A lot better. Exhibit A: Well-known hyper-miler Wayne Gerdes pulled down 111.9 miles in a 2016 example.Of course, it’s not practical for most of us to try to eke out that sort of result, but to Edmunds point that one could “…keep in electric mode almost indefinitely,” we concur. Volt owners are notorious (in a good way, of course) for not using the range-extending abilities of their cars. We noted an extreme example of this behavior a couple years back when one owner managed to put 100,000 miles on his first-gen Volt, which “only” offered 38 miles of AER, while managing to keep it in EV mode 99.9 percent of that distance.InsideEVs has a number of Chevy Volt owners among its readership, and so we put this question to you too, what’s the best AER figure you’ve managed in your car. Let us know in Comments.Chevy Volt Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 9, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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Stunning Audi etron GT Concept Wallpaper Wednesday

first_imgAudi e-tron GT Concept for your desktopThe Audi e-tron GT concept is described by the German manufacturer as four-door Gran Turismo and it’s by far one of the most beautiful electric cars ever made. It just debuted in LA and you’ll find all the details here.The joy is all that much greater since it will go into production by the end of 2020. Here are 15 high-resolution images for your desktop.More wallpapers Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Wallpaper Wednesday: Top 12 Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid Images Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Source: Electric Vehicle News Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Newly Revealed Audi e-tron: Wallpaper Tuesday Wallpaper Wednesday: Rimac C_Two – Our Top 20 Images Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) You can find more wallpapers in our Wallpaper Wednesday series.*Images can be enlarged to width of 2,560Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Audi e-tron GT concept (wallpaper 2,560x – click to enlarge) Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 28, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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Predicting winners is foolhardy I should know I bet on Sunderland

first_imgSteve Cram A couple of weeks before the Beijing Olympics he announced that Team GB would win 48 medals. Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Facebook mabr Winter Olympics Share on Facebook Report View more comments 0 1 Winter sports holidays Report 0 1 Share on Facebook Sunderland Reply Hegelian 17 Feb 2009 18:07 Share 100 Order by oldest Share on Twitter | Pick Reply Email (optional) 25 Winter Olympics 2010 Share on Facebook Sport blogposts Reply Share on Twitter | Pick 0 1 Would you have bet on this man being fallible? Photograph: John Giles/PA A strange question. What would be the point of betting if it wasn’t uncertain? Barra, who is well known to me through athletic circles, has become something of an oracle due to some of his pronouncements last year and one in particular. A couple of weeks before the Beijing Olympics he announced that Team GB would win 48 medals. This far surpassed UK Sports’ suggestion of 35 and even the BOA’s private hopes of around 40.When the total of 47 was achieved he was hailed as a genius and was, no doubt, immediately signed up by Ladbrokes. The truth is that he was correct in only 16 of the 47 cases although a few others named won medals of a different colour from that which he suggested. In athletics he named only one of our four medallists and in swimming only one from six.He predicted only seven cycling medals as opposed to the 14 achieved and, although he did go for three boxing medals, they all came in different weight divisions from those he had outlined. Nonetheless, he fared better than the other detailed studies in that he put Team GB fourth in the table.Sports Illustrated pitched in with a ninth place from 35 medals. That included a prediction that the British Athletics team would do no better than one medal from Phillips Idowu. There are those who take a more general view of a sport who claim to be able to predict broader trends and outcomes.Professor Dan Johnson in Colorado uses his economics background to predict medal results. He argues that the GDP per capita is as good an indicator as any. He factors in other parameters such as climate and home nation bias and claims that at the four summer and winter Olympics prior to Beijing this gave an average 94% success rate.On that basis Team GB should have won no more than 28 medals in China. Perhaps his model needs to factor in lottery funding or even the credit crunch. The only evidence which is irrefutable is that thankfully sport still has the ability to defy the statisticians and humiliate the experts.Despite this we will happily continue to devote an inordinate amount of air time, column inches and online oratory to one of life’s great futilities. Even the sports which have invested millions in eliminating as many of the variables as possible would never be so bold as to make public prophecies.When Sir Chris Hoy can end up in a crumpled heap, then what hope sporting certainty? If however, you are still not convinced that sports prediction is a mugs’ game, then here are two of my own. One year from now the women’s downhill in Vancouver will see an 18-year-old Swiss skier called Lara Gut win an Olympic medal and Sunderland will win away at Arsenal on Saturday. My success rate is about 50%. Take your pick. Reuse this content,View all comments > Predicting winners is foolhardy. I should know, I bet on Sunderland Share fillo Support The Guardian Sportblog Successful gambling has little to do with predicting winners. It’s all about identifying situations that have a better chance of happening than the betting odds suggest. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Twitter All Sportblog | Pick Facebook Olympics 2008: Athletics 18 Feb 2009 2:33 Twitter Share 0 1 Twitter Mon 16 Feb 2009 19.10 EST Sport Facebook 17 Feb 2009 20:50 Share 0 1 i bet last night. i won.i will do it again tonight and for the rest of the week.maybe steve cram should change his bet to a more commonly occuring scoreline. 17 Feb 2009 19:21 Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Reply It is particularly satisfying to see the failure of arrogant predictions.In 1992, Nike sponsored a clutch of superstars expected to dominate at the Barcelona Olympics. I still remember their adverts plastered on giant billboards all over London:”You just went past Michael Johnson. That is more than anyone else will do this summer.” (200m world record holder – he didn’t make the final)”Never heard the Algerian national anthem? You will.” (for Noureddine Morceli, 1500m world record holder, who finished sixth)”Spanish air traffic control has been warned.” (for Sergei Bubka, pole vault world record holder, who failed his first 3 jumps and was eliminated)Ah, schadenfreude! collapsed Share on Facebook Share Share on Pinterest Share on Messenger Share on Twitter Loading comments… Trouble loading? Share on Facebook Report Report Reason (optional) Reportcenter_img Share on LinkedIn Reply I assume I am not alone in finding our preoccupation with sporting predictions as baffling as the subject itself. Perfectly respectable pundits indulge quite happily in the utterly futile exercise on a weekly basis and occasionally, due to statistical inevitability, they get the odd one right.I admit to having a modest wager at every Sunderland home game that we will prevail 3–1. It offers generous returns but a check on the last few years shows that I’ve been successful twice in the past four seasons. However ill-placed my judgment may seem, it was based on the confidence gained from predicting three such victories in 2004-05.On Friday when the cricketing cognoscenti looked at the wicket at the Antigua Recreation Ground – after the farce at the Sir Vivian Richards Stadium which saw the second Test abandoned and a third hurriedly arranged – a bowling bonanza was predicted. As I sit writing this, England’s batsmen continue to pull, push and drive such suggestions away, although knowing them that will probably change. So why do we bother?At least for most of us it is nothing more than a harmless bit of fun but, as the betting industry will no doubt attest, there are those who consider themselves significantly scientific or insightful to get ahead of the game. This rarely proves the case and those for whom this is a genuinely important and meaningful exercise find a significant success rate difficult to achieve even when dealing with less volatile outcomes than goals scored or runs accrued.The British Olympic Association was delighted this week that the first medal predictions for the Winter Olympics in Vancouver next February have Team GB once again rising up the rankings. Of course, after one silver from Shelley Rudman last time improvement would not be difficult. The much respected sporting luminary Luciano Barra has predicted a move up to 16th in the medal table based on – wait for it – two medals this time. Report Report Share on Twitter Twitter Share on WhatsApp Comments 8 Show 25 17 Feb 2009 19:35 unthreaded 50 0 1 … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. | Pick Read more 0 1 BLUEMICK Twitter Facebook Threads collapsed Caspian2 Share on Twitter Why do we bother with gambling, stats or economic theory when the very essence of sport is its uncertainty? First published on Mon 16 Feb 2009 19.10 EST A better question is , why do we pay any heed to “experts” whose predictions are only ever correct by chance? Share Reply Facebook Since you’re here… Twitter 0 1 | Pick Reply Twitter Report Share on Facebook 17 Feb 2009 19:24 Share Facebook Share via Email oldest Share via Email Topics Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Report recommendations comments (8)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. If it waspredictable would we bet…?Or would that defeat the whole point – that it is unlikely/unpredictable. Surely that’s the whole point of odds? Share Close report comment form | Pick expanded When the total of 47 was achieved he was hailed as a geniusThe first sign that he isn’t a genius, just a lucky punter, is the exact figure of 48. Think of the crashes, muscle strains, failed drug tests, lucky shots, dropped batons etc. There are so many unpredictable winners that anyone guessing an exact number just got lucky.If enough people make guesses, one of them will get close. It’s like the “guess the number of sweets in the jar” contest at the village fete. Just cos’ Mrs Brown won the contest it doesn’t mean she’s suddenly a genius.It’s just the old story of small numbers/big numbers. Even the greatest expert doesn’t knows whether Sunderland will win 3-1 at the weekend (one game), but any fool could predict that they will finish in the lower half of the table and flirt with relegation for a while (38 games). If you know more than the fools, bet lots, long term on large numbers. JamesDonaghy The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage 18 Feb 2009 3:19 newest Facebook Twitter Twitter Athletics Successful gambling has little to do with predicting winners. It’s all about identifying situations that have a better chance of happening than the betting odds suggest.You saved me a job, Mick. Share on Twitter Share on Facebook | Pick LeCoqSportif | Pick Share on Facebook LordPesk Share on Facebook Share on Twitter 18 Feb 2009 0:10 Shares00 Reply Facebook Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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Fifth Circuit Grants Emergency Stay in Whooping Crane Case

first_img Username Remember me Lost your password? A three-judge panel on Tuesday granted an emergency stay requested by Texas officials and large energy business interests to stop a lower federal court from enforcing sweeping environmental reforms in an effort to save whooping cranes under the Endangered Species Act . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Passwordlast_img

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VE Advises Blackstone Energy Partners in Formation of Tamarind Energy

first_img Remember me Username Blackstone Energy is investing $800 million to create South East Asia oil and gas development called Tamarind Energy . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Lost your password?center_img Password Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img

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Updated Lax reviewing practice prompts 60 retractions at SAGE journal

Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The academic publishing industry has been rocked by scandals in recent years, most of them uncovered by outsiders. But the latest comes from an internal probe: A 14-month investigation by the publisher SAGE has uncovered a fake peer-review scam involving hundreds of fraudulent and assumed identities. A total of 60 research articles published over the past 4 years in the Journal of Vibration and Control (JVC) are being retracted. SAGE concludes that the scam was orchestrated—possibly alone—by one physicist, Peter Chen, at the National Pingtung University of Education (NPUE) in Taiwan. But what ultimately made the scam possible, ScienceInsider has learned, was a lax editorial policy at the journal.The story broke 8 July at Retraction Watch, but the first hint of a conspiracy emerged in May of last year, says Daniel Sherman, head of public affairs at SAGE. “An author (later confirmed to be an innocent party) contacted SAGE after receiving two suspicious e-mails from individuals related to a paper he had submitted to JVC.” The senders claimed to be university-based scientists but were using Google Gmail accounts. By directly contacting the scientists via their official university e-mail accounts, SAGE investigators discovered that the identity of at least one of the scientists had been stolen—that researcher did not have a Gmail account. (SAGE is not revealing the names of the people involved.) Over the rest of 2013, SAGE investigators quietly followed the trail. They discovered that the assumed identity and Gmail accounts had been used many other times in ScholarOne, SAGE’s online manuscript submission system, and the reviewers and co-authors for those papers were also attached to suspicious e-mail addresses. Sherman says. “We also checked the wording of reviews written by those individuals, as well as the time it took to complete the review,” he says, which in some cases amounted to “a few minutes.”The network of JVC papers that emerged was incestuous, with the same small group of authors reviewing each other’s work and appearing together as co-authors. By the end of the year, the investigators had a list of 130 e-mail addresses associated with 60 papers, with one scientist as co-author on all of them: Chen-Yuan Chen of NPUE, who goes by “Peter.” When SAGE sent an e-mail to all 130 e-mail addresses requesting that the authors confirm their identity, none responded. “The authors were contacted again by SAGE in May 2014 to inform them that their papers would be retracted in the July 2014 issue,” says Sherman, but again none responded. According to SAGE’s official statement, Chen resigned from NPUE in February. Neither Chen nor officials at NPUE responded to e-mails from ScienceInsiderHow was it possible for a scientist to become the sole reviewer on dozens of his own papers? The answer appears to be that Chen was allowed to nominate his own reviewers, who were not vetted by JVC, a journal long led by Editor-in-Chief Ali Nayfeh, a professor emeritus of physics at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg. “In the majority of these papers ‘preferred reviewers’ only were used,” Sherman says, referring to an option made available to SAGE authors when they submit papers. “It is a very common practice across the industry for peer-reviewed journals to allow authors to nominate suggested reviewers. … Editors often find the recommendations helpful, especially for submissions on specialized and niche areas of research.” The lack of vetting, however, meant that JVC violated SAGE’s editorial guidelines, Sherman says. (Like SAGE, the editorial policy at Science is to allow authors to recommend reviewers but to never rely solely upon them. “Editors at Science journals generally use author suggestions as reviewers only if they have independent info that the reviewer is appropriate and likely to give an unbiased review,” according to a statement issued by the journal’s editors.)“In order to ensure that we continue to be compliant with the highest standards of peer-review and publication across the board, SAGE is currently conducting an additional review of our guidance to editors and authors to ensure that it is clear,” Sherman says. The practice of allowing authors to submit preferred reviewers will continue at SAGE’s 700 journals, he said. Nayfeh has resigned as editor of JVC, which is now being run by a group of 30 editors, most of whom were associate or advisory editors. Nayfeh did not respond to e-mails. The secretary of his university department told Science that he had moved to Jordan.*Update, 14 July, 6:04 p.m.: The fallout continues. As reported by Retraction Watch, Taiwan’s minister of education, Chiang Wei-ling, has now resigned. His name appeared on five of the 60 retracted papers from the Journal of Vibration and Control. Chiang claims to not be involved with the conspiracy, but is resigning “to uphold his own reputation and avoid unnecessary disturbance of the work of the education ministry.” Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe read more

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Nearby galaxy gives window into early universe

first_imgA nearby dwarf galaxy is giving astronomers a unique view of what the first stars and galaxies in the universe may have looked like. The early universe was made up almost exclusively of the hydrogen and helium created shortly after the big bang. All the other stuff we have today was made by stars burning hydrogen and helium as fuel, fusing them into heavier elements, and then spewing them out when they explode as supernovae at the end of their lives. Models suggest that the first generation of stars, made almost exclusively of hydrogen and helium, were unlike anything we see today—huge monsters hundreds of times the mass of the sun pumping out intense high-energy radiation. Such stars are thought to have played a role in the epoch of reionization—a period before the universe was 1 billion years old during which all the gas it contained was stripped of electrons, becoming ionized—but they are too far away to be studied. Now, a team of astronomers has surveyed a dwarf galaxy called IZw 18 (pictured above), which has the least heavy elements of any galaxy in the nearby universe. They found a large region of the galaxy giving off a signal of helium being ionized. It takes intense radiation to knock electrons from helium, so the team suggests this month in The Astrophysical Journal Letters that IZw 18 may be the home of modern-day equivalents of those primordial, bright, supergiant stars. Studying them more closely could teach us more about conditions during the epoch of reionization.last_img read more

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Worlds most endangered marine mammal down to 30 individuals

first_img Email The vaquita, a small porpoise found only in Mexico’s Gulf of California, now faces extinction, scientists say in a report published today. Only about 30 individuals remain, according to an acoustic survey that counted the animals’ clicking noises last summer. The report dashes hopes that naval patrols and Mexico’s emergency gillnet ban, authorized in May 2015, would halt the vaquita’s precipitous decline. The numbers also add new urgency to a controversial plan to capture some of the remaining animals for a captive breeding program, scientists say.“The situation is completely out of control,” says Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho, a cetacean expert at the National Institute of Ecology and Climate Change in Ensenada, Mexico, and member of the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita, an international advisory group to the Mexican government. “Of course, there’s a risk in capturing the vaquitas. But it’s clear now that they will be killed [in gillnets] anyway.”A 2015 survey estimated the vaquitas at about 60 individuals. They’re dying out because they get trapped in illegal gillnets, many set to catch another endangered species, the totoaba fish. The fish’s swim bladder commands extraordinarily high prices (sold for as much as $100,000 on the black market, according to a report last year from the Environment Investigation Agency) in China and some other Asian markets, where it is erroneously thought to help with a range of ailments from liver disease to arthritis. The demand has so far proved impossible to control, says Rojas-Bracho, adding that criminal organizations now control the totoaba fishery. Vaquita numbers have plunged precipitously in the past few years. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Efforts to develop alternative gillnets that the vaquitas could escape (as exist now for sea turtles) have also failed, largely because of opposition from and sabotage by suspected totoaba fishers, Rojas-Bracho says. And the 2016 agreement between Mexican President Peña Nieto and former U.S. President Barack Obama to permanently ban gillnets throughout the vaquitas’ range has not changed local fishers’ behavior so far.Vaquitas are shy and rarely seen, but they make clicking noises while hunting. To track their numbers, scientists deployed a grid of 46 click detectors for 60 days throughout the animals’ range in the summer of 2016, using the same sites they’d monitored in 2015. The team also added detectors at 47 new sites in areas where vaquitas spend most of their time. In the 46 standard sites, the number of recorded vaquita clicks per day dropped by 44% from 2015 to 2016, indicating a 49% decline in the cetaceans’ population. The clicks recorded at the additional sites did not alter this grim statistic, or the final conclusion: Vaquitas will be extinct in a few years. Comité Internacional para la Recuperación de la Vaquita, adapted by J. You/Science In a last-ditch effort to save the species, the scientists will attempt to capture an unspecified number of vaquitas in October. Hoping to avoid frightening the porpoises, the recovery team plans to use bottlenose dolphins from the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program to spot them in the gulf’s dark waters. The vaquitas are familiar with dolphins, which also inhabit the gulf.Although details remain to be worked out, the naval trainers say through a spokesperson that they will use standard operant conditioning techniques (think clicker-trainer with your dog) to teach the dolphins to locate the vaquitas. The training will teach the dolphins to use their sonar to seek out “air-filled lungs.” After a dolphin identifies a target, it will learn to touch a plate on the side of the boat to alert its handler, and then swim in the direction of the animal and leap in the air. The dolphins have already completed a successful test run, locating harbor porpoises, which are about the same size as vaquitas, in San Francisco Bay.In the real event, after a dolphin spots a vaquita, members of the recovery team will head toward the porpoise in a small boat, equipped to bring the animal on board. “We have no idea of how they will react,” says Jonas Teilmann, a cetacean biologist at Aarhus University in Denmark, who helped develop methods for working with harbor porpoises, another species that scientists had difficulty keeping alive when captured because they often stopped breathing. “Based on our work with harbor porpoises, we know we must watch their blowhole, and monitor their heart rate.” When porpoises dive, Teilmann explains, the water pressure on their breastbone, which is softer than ours, tells them to stop breathing so that they do not drown. Unfortunately, when removed from the water and placed on a hard surface, the cetaceans also experience this pressure through gravity—a sensation they’ve never felt before—and often automatically stop breathing. Teilmann’s team discovered that putting the porpoise on a stack of thick baby changing pads somehow removes that pressure, and the cetaceans  begin breathing normally again.Rojas-Bracho and the team wish that they could begin the capture and breeding program sooner. Unfortunately, the legal curvina fishing season is to open shortly. Between 600 and 1000 permits may be given, says Rojas-Bracho, who calls the action “madness,” particularly because it is not yet clear whether the gillnet ban will continue to be enforced. Illegal totoaba nets remain a danger, too. Indeed, already this year, a fisherman showed Rojas-Bracho a photo of another dead vaquita in a gillnet. “If there were 30 at the end of last summer, there are probably fewer now,” he says.“We wish we could leave them in the wild,” Teilmann adds. “But right now there’s no other way to stop their extinction.”last_img read more

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Spinning black holes could fling off clouds of dark matter particles

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Spinning black holes could fling off clouds of dark matter particles Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Masha Baryakhtar By Adrian ChoFeb. 22, 2017 , 2:45 PMcenter_img A spinning black hole (white) should produce huge clouds of particles called axions (blue), which would then produce detectable gravitational waves, a new calculation predicts. Email Few things are more mind bending than black holes, gravitational waves, and the nearly massless hypothetical particles called axions, which could be the mysterious dark matter whose gravity holds galaxies together. Now, a team of theoretical physicists has tied all three together in a surprising way. If the axion exists and has the right mass, they argue, then a spinning black hole should produce a vast cloud of the particles, which should, in turn, produce gravitational waves akin to those discovered a year ago by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). If the idea is correct, LIGO might be able to detect axions, albeit indirectly.“It’s an awesome idea,” says Tracy Slatyer, a particle astrophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, who was not involved in the work. “The [LIGO] data is going to be there, and it would be amazing if we saw something.” Benjamin Safdi, a theoretical particle physicist at MIT, is also enthusiastic. “This is really the best idea we have to look for particles in this mass range,” he says.A black hole is the intense gravitational field left behind when a massive star burns out and collapses to a point. Within a certain distance of that point—which defines the black hole’s “event horizon”—gravity grows so strong that not even light can escape. In September 2015, LIGO detected a burst of ripples in space called gravitational waves that emanated from the merging of two black holes. The axion—if it exists—is an uncharged particle perhaps a billionth as massive as the electron or lighter. Dreamed up in the 1970s, it helps explain a curious mathematical symmetry in the theory of particles called quarks and gluons that make up protons and neutrons. Axions floating around might also be the dark matter that’s thought to make up 85% of all matter in the universe. Particle physicists are searching for axions in experiments that try to convert them into photons using magnetic fields.But it may be possible to detect axions by studying black holes with LIGO and its twin detectors in Louisiana and Washington states, argue Asimina Arvanitaki and Masha Baryakhtar, theorists at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, and their colleagues.If its mass is in the right range, then an axion stuck in orbit around a black hole should be subject to a process called superradiance that occurs in many situations and causes photons to multiply in a certain type of laser. If an axion strays near, but doesn’t cross, a black hole’s event horizon, then the black hole’s spin will give the axion a boost in energy. And because the axion is a quantum particle with some properties like those of the photon, that boost will create more axions, which will, in turn, interact with the black hole in the same way. The runaway process should thus generate vast numbers of the particles.But for this to take place, a key condition has to be met. A quantum particle like the axion can also act like a wave, with lighter particles having longer wavelengths. For superradiance to kick in, the axion’s wavelength must be as long as the black hole is wide. So the axion’s mass must be extremely light: between 1/10,000,000 and 1/10,000 the range probed in current laboratory experiments. The axions wouldn’t just emerge willy-nilly, either, but would crowd into huge quantum waves like the orbitals of the electrons in an atom. As fantastical as that sounds, the basic physics of superradiance is well established, Safdi says.The axion cloud might reveal itself in multiple ways, Baryakhtar says. Most promising, axions colliding in the cloud should annihilate one another to produce gravitons, the particles thought to make up gravitational waves just as photons make up light. Emerging from orderly quantum clouds, the gravitons would form continuous waves with a frequency set by the axion’s mass. LIGO would be able to spot thousands of such sources per year, Baryakhtar and colleagues estimate in a paper published 8 February in Physical Review D—although tracking those continuous signals may be harder than detecting bursts from colliding black holes. Spotting multiple same-frequency sources would be a “smoking gun” for axions, Slatyer says.The axion clouds could produce indirect signals, too. In principle, a black hole can spin at near light speed. However, generating axions would sap a black hole’s angular momentum and slow it. As a result, LIGO should observe that the spins of colliding black holes never reach that ultimate speed, but top out well below it, Baryakhtar says. Detecting that limit on spin would be challenging, as LIGO can measure a colliding black hole’s spin with only 25% precision.Safdi cautions that the analysis assumes that LIGO will see lots of black-hole mergers and will perform as expected. And if LIGO doesn’t see the signals, it won’t rule out the axion, he says. Still, he says, “This is probably the most promising paper I’ve seen so far on the new physics we might probe with gravitational waves.”last_img read more

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Iconic Arecibo radio telescope saved by university consortium

first_img GDA/AP Images Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The Arecibo radio telescope will soon be managed by a university consortium. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Users of the 305-meter radio dish include astronomers, planetary scientists, and atmospheric physicists, and Arecibo is still a powerful scientific tool for them, even at 54 years old. The agreement with UCF also recognizes Arecibo’s significance beyond the scientific community, Ulvestad says. “It’s a hugely important technological icon in an underserved community,” he says.Some scientists are relieved that the facility avoided closure, even though they lament the handover from NSF. “I am pleased by the commitment of new management to continue and to expand the scientific and educational excellence of Arecibo Observatory,” says Robert Kerr, former Arecibo director. “I am disappointed by the tragic and ill-conceived divestment by NSF. That is a net loss for the foundation, and for basic U.S. scientific research and development.”NSF views the agreement with UCF as a possible blueprint for efforts to finding alternative funding for other aging telescopes, Green says. In particular, in 2012 a review committee recommended that the agency ramp down its funding for the 100-meter Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia. “We’re hoping that [the Arecibo agreement] will give us and the community confidence that as other divestment efforts proceed, we can reach similar outcomes,” Green says.*Correction, 22 February, 4:55 p.m.: The story has been corrected to indicate that the current 100-meter Green Bank Telescope began operations in 2001, after the original 90-meter telescope collapsed in 1988. Iconic Arecibo radio telescope saved by university consortiumcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Daniel Clery, Adrian ChoFeb. 22, 2018 , 3:45 PM Email A consortium led by the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando will take over management of the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, home to one of the world’s largest radio telescopes, the National Science Foundation (NSF) in Alexandria, Virginia, announced today. NSF has been looking for another body to take over the running of the iconic facility ever since a 2006 review suggested the agency ramp down its funding to free up money for newer projects.“We’re delighted that there are signatures on paper,” says Richard Green, director of NSF’s astronomical sciences division. “That’s a fabulous moment at the end of a long process.” NSF now spends $8 million a year to run Arecibo, with NASA pitching in another $3.6 million. Under the agreement signed today, by 1 October 2022, NSF’s contribution will shrink to $2 million per year, with the UCF consortium making up the difference. UCF will complete the takeover as operator on 1 April, although an agreement detailing the transfer of funds must still be finalized, says James Ulvestad, NSF’s chief officer for scientific facilities.UCF has teamed up with the Metropolitan University in San Juan and Yang Enterprises in Oviedo, Florida, a company that has NASA and U.S. Air Force contracts to operate and maintain facilities. Ray Lugo, head of UCF’s Florida Space Institute, says the consortium hopes to bring in new users to contribute toward costs. He says the U.S. Department of Defense may want to use Arecibo to test sensors, while space mining companies may want to scope out target asteroids. “We want to bring other customers to the table,” he says. The consortium also wants to expand the telescope’s scientific capabilities, in part by upgrading equipment as repairs are carried out in the wake of damage suffered during following Hurricane Maria.last_img read more

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Virginia Beach Mass Shooting Suspect Is Identified

first_img Derion Vence, Maleah Davis, Brittany Bowens We are at the suspected shooter’s home in Virginia Beach. Police on scene #13NewsNow #VBSTRONG pic.twitter.com/KsX65M5iqE— Jaclyn Lee 13News Now (@13JaclynLee) June 1, 2019 SEE ALSO:Maleah Davis’ Stepfather Tells Police What Happened To The Missing 4-Year-OldCharlamagne Tha God Compares Elizabeth Warren To Rachel Dolezal In the meantime, investigators were working to learn more about Craddock. The suspected mass shooter who killed at least 11 people and injured at least six others at a municipal center in Virginia Beach on Friday afternoon was widely identified across social media as DeWayne Craddock. The Wall Street Journal also reported that the gunman was identified as DeWayne Craddock, a 40-year-old Black man who “made multiple firearm purchases in recent weeks.” Original story: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail #VirginaBeach #ShootingStill a mass shooting !!Pray for victims !!The killer a municipal employee #DewayneCraddock,was killed by police !!! pic.twitter.com/BhvsbDiZII— jean serran (@jeanserran) June 1, 2019 UPDATED: 3:19 a.m., June 1 — The death toll has risen after a mass shooting in Virginia Beach municipal building on Friday. A 12th person died from the gun violence that was allegedly perpetrated by DeWayne Craddock, a 40-year-old longtime city worker who was reportedly disgruntled after being fired recently.The 12th shooting victim reportedly died on the way to the hospital.The number of injured was reduced from six to four, according to the Associated Press, which reported that one of the people wounded was a police officer whose bulletproof vest saved his life. DeWayne Craddock , Mass Shootings , Virginia Beach mass shooting A Disturbing Timeline Of 4-Year-Old Maleah Davis Going Missing After Being Left With Her Stepfather I am at the home of the suspect. He lived above Cassetty Howerin. @WAVY_News pic.twitter.com/gW8CjGRYyG— Andy Fox (@AndyFoxWAVY) June 1, 2019 “This is the most devastating day in the history of Virginia Beach,” Mayor Bobby Dyer said after the shooting. “The people involved are our friends, co-workers, neighbors, colleagues.”Cable news outlets described the shooter as being disgruntled and the Wall Street Journal reported that he was a “longtime city employee who had been fired entered a municipal building in Virginia Beach, Va., Friday afternoon to exact revenge.”A web page on the MyLife.com listed information about a Virginia Beach resident named DeWayne Craddock as being 40 years old and having a birthday on Oct. 15, 1978. It lists him as a Black registered Democrat and Christian who is married.The shooter died in an exchange of gunfire with police.Heavy.com produced a photo of DeWayne Craddock that showed an image of a Black man.If it does turn out that Craddock was the gunman, the fact that he is Black would offer a unique narrative surrounding the spate of mass shootings that have been taking place across the U.S. in recent years.“Statistics show that since 1982, the majority of mass shootings — 54 percent — were committed by white men,” Newsweek reported while citing statistics on mass shootings compiled by Mother Jones. “Black people were the second largest perpetrators of mass shootings based on ethnic background, but only accounted for roughly 16 percent of the total incidents during the same time period.”That Newsweek report was from 2017, before the Parkland massacre and other public shootings that resulted in mass deaths perpetrated by white males.Between 1982 and June of last year, 59 of the 101 mass shootings in that time span were launched by white people, according to data provided by Statista, which offers “statistics and studies from more than 22,500 sources.” Black people had the next-highest number of mass shooters at 16.last_img read more

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Declining enrollment forces revision to Winslow School District budget

first_imgOctober 23, 2017 Declining enrollment forces revision to Winslow School District budget By L. Parsons The Winslow Unified School District Governing Board approved a revision of the 2017-18 budget last week. The revision reflects the decrease in funding the district will receive totaling $435,000, due primarily toSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

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Veterans ceremony

first_imgNovember 10, 2017 Veterans ceremony RelatedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adcenter_img Photo by L. ParsonsIn anticipation of Veteran’s Day, several Winslow vets gathered for coffee and to swap stories last week. Members of the Army and the Navy shared their experiences in service and in civilian life. They included, (left to right) US Navy 2nd Class Petty Officer Jim Irwin, US Navy 2nd Class Petty Officer Ben Irwin, US Army Private Wayne Garrett, US Army Airborne Sgt. Richard Hodge and US Army Special Forces Sgt. Tim Martin. Martin said, “The military was and is big in my family.” Explaining what led to his enlistment he said, “It was in my blood and something I wanted to do.” Veteran’s Day is the celebration of veterans of all branches of service who have served in both peacetime and during conflict. It is commemorated Nov. 11 every year.last_img read more

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Theresa Warren recognized for service to the community

first_imgApril 18, 2019 Photo by L. ParsonsTheresa Warren (pictured), the Executive Director of Alice’s Place in Winslow, received the Distinguished Service Award for Leadership from the Arizona Attorney General’s office. Warren has held her position as Executive Director for 11 years and said, “I am so honored to have received this award, but I truly believe it must be shared with everyone. Our current and past staff who work tirelessly and have made huge differences in the safety and quality of so many lives. Our board members, and our Board President, Greg Hackler who has stuck with us through thick and thin, and our wonderful community.” Theresa Warren recognized for service to the communitycenter_img RelatedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img read more

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Day after quitting as Rajya Sabha MP Neeraj Shekhar joins BJP

first_img Delhi: Ex-BJP MLA acquitted for ‘stopping’ train in 2010 The saffron party is likely to nominate him as its Rajya Sabha candidate from Uttar Pradesh, PTI reported.Rajya Sabha Chairman M Venkaiah Naidu said he had accepted the resignation of Shekhar after being satisfied that it was voluntary and genuine. “I made inquiries (with Shekhar) of the resignation being voluntary and genuine and having satisfied I have accepted the resignation with effect from July 15,” he said.A two-time Lok Sabha MP, Shekhar was first elected to the Lower House in a by-election in Ballia in 2007 after his father’s death. He retained the seat in the 2009 Lok Sabha elections. West Bengal: Police intervene after BJP workers chanting Hanuman Chalisa block road in Howrah By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 16, 2019 6:02:49 pm Related News Following his defeat in the 2014 parliamentary polls, the SP chose him for a Rajya Sabha berth. Shekhar’s term in the Upper House was to expire on November 2020.In the 2019 Lok Sabha elections, the SP got the Ballia seat as part of its seat-sharing arrangement with the BSP but decided to field former MLA Sanatan Pandey who eventually lost. Sources said Shekhar had been feeling sidelined after being overlooked for the Ballia ticket.Responding to the development, SP spokesperson Rajendra Chaudhary had said, “It is unfair on Shekhar’s behalf to take such a step. The SP sent him to Rajya Sabha even when he lost the Lok Sabha polls. He should have stuck to some political morals and values.”(With inputs from PTI) Advertising Neeraj Shekhar, sp, bjp, neeraj shekhar joins bjp, chandra shekhar son, resigns from Rajya sabha, rajya sabha mp, indian express Neeraj Shekhar joined BJP on Tuesday. (Express Photo: Prem Nath Pandey)A day after Neeraj Shekhar quit Samajwadi Party and resigned as Rajya Sabha MP, the son of former prime minister Chandra Shekhar Tuesday joined BJP in the presence of the party’s general secretaries Bhupendra Yadav and Anil Jain. 11 Comment(s) Mukul Roy claims 107 West Bengal MLAs from CPM, Congress, and TMC will join BJP Advertisinglast_img read more

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This is the most detailed view ever of a developing mouse

first_imgK. MCDOLE ET AL., CELL 10.1016 (2018) By Gretchen VogelOct. 11, 2018 , 11:00 AM The new view will help scientists better understand the genes and other factors that shape organs during development. That, in turn, could help them improve their attempts to coax stem cells in the lab to do the same thing. This is the most detailed view ever of a developing mouse These color-coded mouse embryos represent a breakthrough for understanding early mammalian development. A powerful new computer-assisted microscope has for the first time let researchers observe how a mouse embryo develops primitive organs, following the fate of individual cells along the way.The microscope, described today in Cell, shines a sheet of laser light through the embryo, allowing researchers to see the cells deep inside. Earlier versions of the microscope were able to analyze zebrafish and fruit fly embryos, but mouse embryos are much more difficult. They are not only harder to keep alive in the lab, they are also much larger—making it much more difficult to see all the way through them. The microscope uses new machine learning techniques—a form of artificial intelligence in which computers learn from data—to track the embryo and keep it in focus as it drifts in its culture medium and grows by an order of magnitude from day 6 to day 8 of development. It also uses advanced algorithms to sort through millions of images to track cells as they move and divide.The researchers combined their analysis of several embryos to create a “digital mouse embryo,” which they have made publicly available along with the software and directions for building the microscope. In the image above, blue cells will become part of the heart and green cells will become the neural tube, which later forms the brain and spinal cord. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

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Android Creator Launches a Phone of His Own

first_imgThere are those who have a more sanguine view of Essential’s prospects, however.”If the new phone delivers on everything it promises, I believe it can compete,” Moorhead said.”It’s vital, though, that there’s a very long road map of modules to connect,” he added.The going will be tough for Essential, when you consider the money and marketing muscle that Apple, Samsung and Google have, Moorhead acknowledged.”Then again, Rubin has considerable resources of his own and a reputation that overshadows at least some of the competition. If any entrepreneur could pull this off, Rubin can,” he said.Essential’s assumption that there’s room for true innovation at the top of the smartphone market is appealing, said Charles King, the principal analyst at Pund-IT.”The vendors in that space, particularly Apple, have been content to become providers of incremental improvements rather than forward-looking visionaries,” he told TechNewsWorld.”If Rubin forces competitors to dig deeper,” King said, “so much the better for consumers and the industry.” John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John. Despite the quality of its build and some intriguing features, the Essential Phone likely faces a tough road ahead.”I have some doubts about the impact it can have without a big brand behind it,” said Bob O’Donnell, chief analyst at Technalysis Research.”It’ll appeal to tech folks who want the coolest and latest and greatest, but I don’t see it becoming a mainstream product, so I think it will be challenged,” he told TechNewsWorld.The audience for the Essential Phone may be limited, said Kevin Krewell, a principal analyst at Tirias Research.”It seems to appeal to people who are suspicious of Google’s use of their data,” he told TechNewsWorld. “It’s also going to appeal to the tech elite who want something a little different.”From a hardware perspective, the Essential Phone looks very good, Krewell said.”The edge-to-edge screen is impressive and the materials are top notch — but the difference is the ecosystem and distribution channels the big companies have,” he pointed out. “I’m skeptical that it can make a significant impact. While the tech community is interested in it because it’s Andy Rubin, the larger market will not know who Andy Rubin is.” Accessories can be added to the phone via a magnetic connector on its backside. Two accessories are included with the unit — a 360-degree camera and a charging dock.Also on the phone’s back is 13-MP dual sensor camera. Unlike other phones with dual-sensor cameras, which use the second sensor to take telephoto pictures or create bokeh effects, Essential uses its second sensor to boost low-light performance.Like some other high-end phone models, the Essential mobile doesn’t have a headphone jack.In addition to its smartphone, Essential announced Home, a smart home hub. It runs on Ambient OS, an operating system that Essential hopes will become the Android of the IoT world.Home is designed to tie together all the disparate protocols now in the space — SmartThings, HomeKit, Nest and others — as well as the various digital assistants — Alexa, Siri and Google Assistant — into a seamless user experience.”I like that Rubin announced both the new phone and the home hub,” said Patrick Moorhead, principal analyst at Moor Insights and Strategy.”It reinforces that the company isn’t just a point player, and that matters to distribution channels,” he told TechNewsWorld. Tough Road Aheadcenter_img Pushing Innovation Essential, a company founded by Andy Rubin, the “father of Android,” on Tuesday pulled off the wraps on a new high-end smartphone.The Essential Phone, priced at US$699, includes radios for connecting to all major U.S. carriers.The unit has an almost edge-to-edge display (there’s a bit of bezel at the bottom of its screen) that wraps around the 8-MP selfie camera at the front.Built around a Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor, the Essential Phone comes with 4 GB of RAM and 128 GB of storage.For durability, the phone has a titanium and ceramic body, which allows it to survive drops with nary a blemish, according to the company. Magnetic Accessorieslast_img read more

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Consensus on housing policies can make affordable housing a possibility for Americans

first_img Source:https://news.psu.edu/story/542875/2018/10/19/research/bringing-americans-together-issue-affordable-housing Oct 24 2018A lack of affordable housing is linked with many health problems, including asthma, stress and alcoholism. Penn State researchers found that while some Americans may be less aware of this link, there may be ways to communicate this connection in a way that resonates with those groups.The researchers found that high-income citizens and conservatives were less likely to acknowledge the link between housing affordability and health than people in lower income brackets or other political affiliations. These groups were also more responsive to the themes of “personal responsibility” and “stability and security.”Selena Ortiz, assistant professor of health policy and administration, said she hopes these insights — recently published in the journal SSM – Population Health — can help improve communications about health and housing affordability.”If there’s a way we can use those themes and incorporate them into communications, maybe our message can resonate with those groups more,” Ortiz said. “If we can talk about improving housing affordability in terms of allowing someone to secure a healthy, stable life, while also not discounting this theme of personal responsibility, maybe that could help.”Ortiz says that while the term “affordable housing crisis” makes it sound like this is a new problem, the issue has been around for decades. She said that currently, a worker making minimum wage is unable to spend less than 30 percent of their income on rent or a mortgage anywhere in the U.S. Additionally, an estimated 12 million American households pay more than 50 percent of their income on housing.The researchers said that people living in unaffordable housing are at risk for many negative health outcomes, both physically and mentally. Unsafe living conditions could put them at risk for lead or asbestos poisoning, while also placing them at a higher risk for drug or alcohol abuse and stress from the threat of eviction.”There’s real consequences, including having to worry every single month about how are you going to scrape the money together to pay for your rent or mortgage,” Ortiz said. “The fear and act of eviction is also pretty powerful. And with children who go through that, there could be effects that linger throughout their lives — which we just don’t know about yet.”To investigate how Americans feel about the link between health and housing affordability, the researchers used data from 400 adults who were members of the Survey Sampling International online research panel, which is representative of the U.S. in terms of gender, age, race, income and educational levels.Related StoriesDogs and cats relieve academic stress and lift students’ mood, according to a new studyChaos in the house and asthma in children – the connectionTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTThe participants were asked questions about their income and political affiliation, along with whether they agreed that the cost and affordability of housing was related to a person’s health. They also answered an open-ended question about how and why housing affordability matters.After analyzing the data, the researchers found that overall, most of the participants agreed that housing affordability was linked to health. About 83 percent of Democrats, 65 percent of Independents and 61 percent of Republicans agreed with the connection. About 43 percent of respondents in the highest income bracket agreed, contrasted with 70 percent in the lower income groups.Ortiz said that while the participants largely agreed to the first question of whether housing affordability matters to health, when asked an open-ended question about why housing affordability matters, health rarely came up.”Even in this short survey, the concept of health wasn’t very salient,” Ortiz said. “It just goes to show that we need to be very explicit and very forthcoming in our messaging about this link again and again and again, because it doesn’t stick in our minds.”The groups that were less likely to agree that housing affordability was linked with health were also more likely to talk about “personal responsibility” and “security and stability” when asked why housing affordability matters.”If we know these groups value these themes, maybe we can fold them into our communications in a way that doesn’t discount these beliefs,” Ortiz said. “Is there a way, for example, to not discount personal responsibility while also explaining that you can still have an individual that’s working 40 hours plus and they still can’t afford their home and provide for their family? How do we emphasize that affordable housing enables individuals to exercise their own agency to secure a better life for them and their families?”Ortiz said she hopes her research can help bring Americans together to agree on housing policies that can make affordable housing a possibility for everyone.”This isn’t an issue of people not working hard enough,” Ortiz said. “These are real families and individuals who are struggling, and it has severe public health consequences, not just for them but for us as a society. We have to continue to talk about it and be creative about how we communicate about it.”last_img read more

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Study points toward new strategies for managing organ transplantation

first_img Source:https://www.cuimc.columbia.edu/news/some-blood-cells-have-surprising-source-your-gut Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 30 2018The human intestine may provide up to 10 percent of blood cells in circulation from its own reservoir of blood-forming stem cells, a surprising new study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons has found.Scientists had previously thought that blood cells are created exclusively in the bone marrow from a special population of hematopoietic stem cells.Why It MattersIntestinal transplantation is the only long-term option for patients with Crohn’s and other diseases if their intestines fail. But high rejection rates and life-threatening complications from immunosuppression have limited the success of human intestinal transplantation.When a person receives a transplanted organ, the immune system often recognizes the new organ as foreign and destroys it. Powerful immunosuppressive drugs blunt these responses, but that makes the patient much more susceptible to infections and other complications.How Do Blood Cells From the Donor Help the Transplant Recipient?Analysis of circulating white blood cells in patients after intestinal transplantation suggests that the cells derived from the donated intestine have matured and been educated in the recipient to be tolerant of the recipient’s own tissues. Likewise, white blood cells made by the recipient after the transplant may be educated to be tolerant of the donated tissue.”We are clearly showing that there’s immunological cross-talk between the two sets of blood cells that protects the transplant from the patient’s immune system and protects the patient from the transplant,” says Sykes.The hematopoietic stem cells in the intestine are eventually replaced by a circulating pool from the recipient, the researchers also found.How the Finding Could Improve TransplantationBecause patients with more donor blood cells had lower organ rejection rates, the results point toward new strategies for managing organ transplantation.The intestine’s reservoir of blood-forming stem cells was discovered when researchers–led by Megan Sykes, MD, director of the Columbia Center for Translational Immunology–noticed that the blood of patients who had received intestinal transplants contained cells from the donor. The researchers tracked the donor’s blood cells back to their source: hematopoietic stem cells in the donated intestine.Related Stories’Google Maps’ for cancer: Image-based model accurately represents blood traffic inside tumorsDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorThe blood cells created from cells in the donor’s intestine also may be beneficial to the transplant recipient. The more donor blood cells a patient had in circulation, the less likely they were to reject their transplants.”It’s possible that patients with a high level of donor cells may not require as much immunosuppression as they are currently getting,” says Sykes, “and reducing immunosuppression could improve outcomes.”Seeding transplanted organs with additional hematopoietic stem cells from the donor may also increase donor-recipient cross-talk and boost tolerance of the transplant.”That could improve the lives of transplant patients dramatically,” Sykes says. “Our ultimate goal is to get immune tolerance, which would allow us to remove immunosuppression altogether and have the graft treated as self by the patient. That’s really the Holy Grail.”What’s NextThe researchers are planning a study that will try to boost the number of hematopoietic stem cells delivered during intestinal transplantation, hopefully leading to higher levels of donor blood cells in circulation, immune tolerance, and a reduced need for immunosuppressive drugs.Other types of transplants may benefit from similar interventions, even for organs that don’t appear to carry their own reservoirs of hematopoietic stem cells.CaveatsThis study analyzed 21 patients who had received intestinal transplants.Although the finding of a novel population of hematopoietic stem cells is exciting, it does not yet justify changes in the current standard of care.Megan Sykes is also the Michael J. Friedlander Professor of Medicine and professor of microbiology & immunology and of surgical sciences (in the Department of Surgery) at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons.The study, “Human Intestinal Allografts Contain Functional Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells that are Maintained by a Circulating Pool,” was published Nov. 29 in Cell Stem Cell.last_img read more

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PET imaging postHBOT shows improvement in brain metabolism in Alzheimers disease

first_img Source:https://www.lsuhsc.edu/newsroom/HBOT%20Showed%20Improvement%20in%20Alzheimer%E2%80%99s%20Disease.html Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 24 2019Dr. Paul Harch, Clinical Professor and Director of Hyperbaric Medicine at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and Dr. Edward Fogarty, Chairman of Radiology at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, report the first PET scan-documented case of improvement in brain metabolism in Alzheimer’s disease in a patient treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). The report, published in the current issue of the peer-reviewed journal Medical Gas Research, is available at http://www.medgasres.com/article.asp?issn=2045-9912;year=2018;volume=8;issue=4;spage=181;epage=184;aulast=Harch.The authors report the case of a 58-year-old female who had experienced five years of cognitive decline, which began accelerating rapidly. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) suggested Alzheimer’s disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by 18Fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging, which revealed global and typical metabolic deficits in Alzheimer’s.The patient underwent a total of 40 HBOT treatments – five days a week over 66 days. Each treatment consisted of 1.15 atmosphere absolute/50 minutes total treatment time. After 21 treatments, the patient reported increased energy and level of activity, better mood and ability to perform daily living activities as well as work crossword puzzles. After 40 treatments, she reported increased memory and concentration, sleep, conversation, appetite, ability to use the computer, more good days (5/7) than bad days, resolved anxiety, and decreased disorientation and frustration. Tremor, deep knee bend, tandem gain, and motor speed were also improved. Repeat 18FDG PET imaging one month post-HBOT showed global 6.5-38% improvement in brain metabolism.”We demonstrated the largest improvement in brain metabolism of any therapy for Alzheimer’s disease,” notes Dr. Harch. “HBOT in this patient may be the first treatment not only to halt, but temporarily reverse disease progression in Alzheimer’s disease.”The report also contains video imaging, including unique rotating PET 3D Surface Reconstructions, which allow the lay person to easily see the improvements in brain function.”PET imaging is used around the world as a biomarker in oncology and cardiology to assay responses to therapy,” says Dr. Fogarty. “We now have an irrefutable biomarker system that this intervention has promise where no other real hope for recovery of dementia has ever existed before.”Related StoriesSex plays major role in Alzheimer’s disease riskAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionThe physicians report that two months post-HBOT, the patient felt a recurrence in her symptoms. She was retreated over the next 20 months with 56 HBOTs (total 96) at the same dose, supplemental oxygen, and medications with stability of her symptoms and Folstein Mini-Mental Status exam.According to the National Institutes of Health, “Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks. It is the most common cause of dementia in older adults. Alzheimer’s disease is currently ranked as the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, but recent estimates indicate that the disorder may rank third, just behind heart disease and cancer, as a cause of death for older people.”The authors note that four pathological processes have been identified and primary treatment is with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine, which have been shown to have a positive impact on Alzheimer’s disease progression with no significant disease-modifying effects.HBOT is an epigenetic modulation of gene expression and suppression to treat wounds and disease pathophysiology, particularly inflammation. HBOT targets all four of the pathological processes of AD by affecting the microcirculation; mitochondrial dysfunction, and biogenesis; reducing amyloid burden and tau phosphorylation; controlling oxidative stress; and reducing inflammation.The first successful HBOT-treated case of Alzheimer’s disease was published in 2001. The present case report is the first patient in a series of 11 HBOT-treated patients with Alzheimer’s disease whose symptomatic improvement is documented with 18fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18FDG PET). “Our results suggest the possibility of treating Alzheimer’s disease long-term with HBOT and pharmacotherapy,” concludes Harch.last_img read more

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